Category: Immigration Tips

How will EU citizens’ rights be protected after exit day?

The EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill gives effect to the Withdrawal Agreement in domestic law. This will ensure that individuals can rely directly on these rights in the UK courts, and will implement the rights to equal treatment and non-discrimination for EU citizens living or working in the UK. Protection of UK nationals living or working in the EU will be provided for by Member States.

The timeline of EU citizens’ rights in the UK:

EXIT DAY

UK leaves the EU and implementation period begins

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD (UNTIL 31 DECEMBER 2020)

During the time limited implementation period EU citizens will have the same rights in the UK as they did before the UK left the EU

GRACE PERIOD

EU citizens will be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for a minimum of six months after 31 December 2020

EU citizens will be able to rely on their rights under the Withdrawal Agreement during the grace period, or until their application is complete

POST-GRACE PERIOD

EU citizens will have secured their rights under the Withdrawal Agreement and can continue living their lives broadly as they do now

EU SETTLEMENT SCHEME

The Withdrawal Agreement provides EU citizens and their family members living in the UK at the end of the implementation period with the right to continue to stay in the UK. EU citizens and their family members can apply for residence status through the EU Settlement Scheme.

The EU Settlement Scheme has been set up via the Immigration Rules because they are already the mechanism for granting leave to enter or remain in the UK. The EU Settlement Scheme has been fully open since 30 March 2019 and is designed to give effect to the UK’s commitments under the Withdrawal Agreement.

From Gov.UK

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brexit

LEGAL MINUTE: Brexit next week and immigration news

The prime minister’s Withdrawal Agreement Act was signed off by the Queen on Thursday after completing its journey through parliament. From Sky News

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Low-skilled migrants are likely to be banned from moving to Britain at the end of this year after the Government moved forwards its plans for a new immigration system. The UK will have the power to end free movement and set its own rules on migration at the end of the Brexit transition period, which runs until 31 December. From iNews

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While at least 1,890 foreigners reached British shores in small boats last year, the Home Office says only about 125 were returned to European countries during the same period. From BBC

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Boris Johnson has promised that the UK’s new immigration policy will put “people before passports” as he used his first set-piece speech of 2020 to extol the benefits of trade with post-Brexit Britain to a major gathering of African leaders. From The Guardian

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Theresa May’s £30,000 salary cap on migrants is to be scrapped to meet demand for skilled workers into Britain after Brexit, under proposals to be published next week. From Telegraph

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The Migration Advisory Committee will produce a report, commissioned by the Home Secretary, next week on what level of migration would suit the British economy best. From iNews

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Boris Johnson has said the UK has “crossed the Brexit finish line” after Parliament passed legislation implementing the withdrawal deal. The EU Bill, which paves the way for the country to leave the bloc on 31 January, is now awaiting royal assent. From BBC

LEGAL MINUTE: first news of the year about Brexit

MPs have given their final backing to the bill that will implement the UK government’s Brexit deal. The Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and it will now pass to the House of Lords for further scrutiny next week. From BBC.

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The European parliament will express its “grave concern” about the attitude of Boris Johnson’s government to the 3.3 million EU citizens living in the UK following threats of deportation made by a British minister. From The Guardian.

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Brexit timetable: here’s what happens next as the UK prepares to leave the EU by 31 January. From iNews.

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Australia has ruled out a post-Brexit trade deal involving visa-free travel and work arrangements with the UK. The country’s trade minister, Simon Birmingham, said he “can’t imagine full and unfettered free movement” would be on the table during negotiations. From The Guardian.

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A Conservative campaign for Big Ben to bong specially to “celebrate” the moment Brexit goes ahead on 31 January appears to have been dashed. From Independent.

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In the months since my visa denial, I have cycled through shame, anger, and despair. I lost a permanent job which would have seen me forge a career in academic skills consultancy, changing my career trajectory completely. From Huffington Post.

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EU teachers are likely to face fees of £4,345 to work in the UK for five years after Brexit in a move that will worsen an existing recruitment crisis, ministers have been warned. From Independent.

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New research estimates that more than 100,000 children are living in London without secure immigration status, despite more than half of them having been born in the UK. From The Guardian.

LEGAL MINUTE: UK election week

A second Brexit referendum is quickly becoming the only option to break the deadlock if a strong majority is not won in the upcoming election, according a new report by University College London. From iNews.

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Meet some of voters who have switched allegiances ahead of the 12 December general election. From BBC.

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Both Labour and Tory migration plans ‘would worsen NHS staffing’. The claim came as it emerged almost one in four hospital staff were born abroad. From The Guardian.

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How European students will be affected by Brexit? Despite many universities efforts to inform and support each of their students, a sense of uncertainty surrounding the subject is all too familiar. From Pie News.

LEGAL MINUTE: immigration, Brexit and elections

EU citizens face deportation after Brexit if they miss application deadline, under hardline UK rules. From Independent.

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A former aide to Boris Johnson is facing calls to quit as a parliamentary candidate after he made comments about immigrants bringing germs and HIV to the UK. From Metro.

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“How the government is using children like my daughter as pawns in their destructive Brexit game” From Independent.

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More than 1,200 academics have signed a letter protesting to the Home Office about the “distressing” case of a research fellow told to leave the UK. Her application for indefinite leave to remain was denied because of the amount of time she has spent overseas. From BBC.

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Speaking at the College of Europe, Tusk said he heard all around the world, and specifically in those countries that were once part of the British empire, that Brexit would leave the UK as an “outsider, a second-rate player”. From The Guardian.

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10 of the most outrageous Home Office refusal letters. All these are real excuses, communicated in official government letters, for declining a visa, refusing asylum or disbelieving some aspect of the applicant’s case. From Free Movement.

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Boris Johnson has unveiled plans for half-price visas and preferential immigration processes for doctors and nurses wanting to work in the UK but faced calls to exempt them from the health surcharge. From The Guardian.

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