Author: Marketing

O que ainda está em discussão sobre o Reino Unido e a Irlanda com Brexit

LEGAL MINUTE: the latest news about Brexit

It’s been a quiet few months, but behind closed doors (and on zoom) Brexit hasn’t gone away. Talks between the EU and the UK have continued through the pandemic, and are about to get a lot busier this summer. From BBC

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British citizens living in the EU may face significant work and travel hurdles from next year because member states have failed to get to grips with the impact of Brexit on their rights, MPs have been told. From The Guardian

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MPs have backed flagship immigration legislation which seeks to end EU freedom of movement rules in the UK. From The Sun

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EU supporters expressed their woes on social media after the clock struck midnight and Britain could no longer request a Brexit delay. From Express

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British MPs have approved the government’s immigration bill which aims to end EU freedom of movement rules in the UK, one of the key factors that led to Brexit. From Euronews

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Scotland could face a labour shortage if the UK Government presses ahead with its planned migration reforms, a new report has warned. From Daily Record

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Almost 60,000 people living in Northern Ireland have applied for the settled status scheme, so they can live and work in the UK post-Brexit. From BBC

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Domestic violence and immigration

Seek help and share this information with those who need it!

In this challenging moment, with so many restrictions imposed and few possibilities to leave home, unfortunately, the number of cases with people exposed to domestic violence is growing.

According to the UK government, domestic violence and abuse is any incident of control, coercive or threatening behaviour. This can include, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse:

  • psychological
  • physical
  • sexual
  • financial
  • emotional

Immigration vs. Domestic Violence

Victims of domestic violence who are married to Britons or are partners with people who have a permanent residence visa may apply for permission to live in the UK permanently when they separate and report the abuser.

The person needs to present, however, the evidence of the abuse suffered and prove that the relationship was interrupted due to domestic violence. The recommendation is to contact the police in case of an emergency and the charities that work with counselling for all cases of abuse. We have separated some below.

Those who apply for a permanent visa, under the protection of this law, do not need to prove their knowledge of the English language or to undergo the Life in the UK test.

Institutions | Charities:

LH4U

LondonHelp4u is offering free consultations for victims of domestic violence throughout the month of July. Contact us and our team will help with the entire immigration process. UK 020 7636 8500, Brazil (11) 3283 0906, HelpLineUK 24h + 44 78 91764830 or send an email to info@londonhelp4u.co.uk

LEGAL MINUTE: UK immigration news

Some 70 per cent of Britons believed the crisis demonstrated the importance of immigration to running essential services. From iNews

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Immigration rules that have left 1 million migrant workers in the UK at risk of destitution because they cannot claim universal credit should be suspended on public health grounds during the pandemic, a cross-party group of MPs has recommended. From The Guardian

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The U.K. tech sector is trying to encourage entrepreneurs affected by President Donald Trump’s immigration restrictions to move to the U.K. and start a company in a city like London. From CNBC

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There are an estimated one million undocumented workers in the UK. The coronavirus pandemic has presented them with a new set of challenges and fears over how to maintain an income, remain healthy or even stay alive. From BBC

LEGAL MINUTE: HO has no idea how many are in the UK illegally

Free visa extensions should be given to all foreign NHS and social care workers, a group of MPs has said. It is “unfair” that some of the lowest paid workers face charges of thousands of pounds to stay in the country, ministers have been told. From BBC

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Boris Johnson will warn the EU today Britain will choose a no-deal Brexit if a trade agreement is not struck by the end of next month. The threat comes despite the head of the World Trade Organisation suggesting that doing so could slow the UK’s economic recovery from coronavirus, and that a deal similar to current arrangements would be better for jobs. From Daily Mail

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“The UK’s ‘new’ points-based immigration system isn’t fairer, faster or firmer – it’s complete nonsense” From Independent

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Brussels is asking European governments to select together the countries to whom they will first give the green light. The decision it says should be based on factors “including the health situation, the ability to apply containment measures during travel, and reciprocity considerations.” From Forbes

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Home Office ‘has no idea how many people are in the UK illegally’. From The Guardian

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“The Home Office must clarify the legal basis for the offers of visa extensions”, says the Home Affairs committee of MPs in a coronavirus report published. From Free Movement

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Boris Johnson promises to refund NHS workers forced to pay immigration health surcharge. From iNews

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LEGAL MINUTE: quarentine and immigration in the UK

QUARANTINE restrictions could descend into chaos on the first day after a Home Office spokesman admitted it was “very hard to imagine how it would work in in practice”. From The Sun

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Coronavirus (COVID-19): If you’re a resident or visitor travelling to the UK, you must provide your journey and contact details, not leave the place you’re staying for the first 14 days you’re in the UK except in very limited situations (known as ‘self-isolating’). From Gov.UK

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British nationals who have spent months apart from non-EU spouses have expressed fears that their separation will become permanent as mass unemployment and furloughing as a result of the Covid crisis could leave them ineligible for visas. From The Guardian

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Thousands of families across Britain have been worried they will be torn apart because job losses during lockdown have meant they no longer earn enough to be eligible for spouse visas, for which the threshold stands at £18,600 per annum. From Independent

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Friday it is not going to seek an extension to the Brexit transition period, the paymaster general, Penny Mordaunt, has said. From The Guardian.

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