Category: General News

LEGAL MINUTE: the news of the first week after Brexit

Indeed, for the first time in my life, I have become an immigrant without the security blanket of our place in the EU – and I feel so. From Independent.

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These immigrants and their children are inevitably conflicted, post-Brexit. Who is welcome here today? Look at the nightmare individual stories emerging from the “settled status” process. From iNews.

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Now that the UK has formally left the European Union, it immediately enters an 11-month transition period. What will change? From BBC.

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Brexit: where do the EU and UK stand before talks begin? The two sides already appear far apart, with negotiations due to finish by October. From The Guardian.

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UK employers are facing continued skills shortages among workers amid concerns that the UK’s future immigration system could cause further problems in finding the right talent, a new report has found. From Yahoo New.

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Government’ statement: The UK is ready to work to establish practical provisions to facilitate smooth border crossing arrangements, as part of independent border and immigration systems. From Gov.uk.

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Home Secretary Priti Patel has today (6 February 2020) announced that there have been more than 3 million applications to the EU Settlement Scheme, according to the latest internal figures. From Gov.uk.

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How will EU citizens’ rights be protected after exit day?

The EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill gives effect to the Withdrawal Agreement in domestic law. This will ensure that individuals can rely directly on these rights in the UK courts, and will implement the rights to equal treatment and non-discrimination for EU citizens living or working in the UK. Protection of UK nationals living or working in the EU will be provided for by Member States.

The timeline of EU citizens’ rights in the UK:

EXIT DAY

UK leaves the EU and implementation period begins

IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD (UNTIL 31 DECEMBER 2020)

During the time limited implementation period EU citizens will have the same rights in the UK as they did before the UK left the EU

GRACE PERIOD

EU citizens will be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for a minimum of six months after 31 December 2020

EU citizens will be able to rely on their rights under the Withdrawal Agreement during the grace period, or until their application is complete

POST-GRACE PERIOD

EU citizens will have secured their rights under the Withdrawal Agreement and can continue living their lives broadly as they do now

EU SETTLEMENT SCHEME

The Withdrawal Agreement provides EU citizens and their family members living in the UK at the end of the implementation period with the right to continue to stay in the UK. EU citizens and their family members can apply for residence status through the EU Settlement Scheme.

The EU Settlement Scheme has been set up via the Immigration Rules because they are already the mechanism for granting leave to enter or remain in the UK. The EU Settlement Scheme has been fully open since 30 March 2019 and is designed to give effect to the UK’s commitments under the Withdrawal Agreement.

From Gov.UK

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LEGAL MINUTE: UK’s last week in the EU

Members of the European Parliament have overwhelmingly backed the terms of the UK’s departure from the EU. MEPs ratified the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement by 621 votes to 49 following an emotional debate in Brussels. From BBC.

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Confused by the whole 1,300-day Brexit saga? This summary sets out how and why it happened, and what can be expected in 2020 and beyond. From The Guardian.

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What happens after the UK leaves the EU? At 11pm on 31 January 2020 the UK will officially leave the European Union. Under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement the UK will then enter a transitional period during which time the UK will abide by EU rules despite no longer being a member. From iNews.

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Top scientists are to be offered fast-track visas for Britain, as ministers finalise plans to slash low-skilled migration from the European Union. From Daily Mail.

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Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) report: points-based system and salary thresholds for immigration. From Gov.UK.

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Negotiations on the UK’s post-Brexit relationship with the EU will start on 3 March, more than a month after the UK’s departure from the bloc, the Guardian can reveal. From The Guardian.

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UK business leaders have welcomed proposals to lower a controversial salary cap to £25,600 ($33,321) for migrant workers coming to fill jobs in the UK. But firms still fear staff shortages in some sectors where employers already struggle to find workers. From Yahoo News.

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In its 271-page report, the migration advisory committee (Mac) does not back an Australian-points based system. Rather, it recommends a mixed system, which would rely on a minimum salary threshold for those people coming to the UK with a job offer and a points-based system for skilled workers coming to the UK without an arranged job. From The Guardian.

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UK nationals rush to settle in Spain before they lose their rights as EU citizens on 31 December. From The Guardian.

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LEGAL MINUTE: Brexit next week and immigration news

The prime minister’s Withdrawal Agreement Act was signed off by the Queen on Thursday after completing its journey through parliament. From Sky News

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Low-skilled migrants are likely to be banned from moving to Britain at the end of this year after the Government moved forwards its plans for a new immigration system. The UK will have the power to end free movement and set its own rules on migration at the end of the Brexit transition period, which runs until 31 December. From iNews

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While at least 1,890 foreigners reached British shores in small boats last year, the Home Office says only about 125 were returned to European countries during the same period. From BBC

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Boris Johnson has promised that the UK’s new immigration policy will put “people before passports” as he used his first set-piece speech of 2020 to extol the benefits of trade with post-Brexit Britain to a major gathering of African leaders. From The Guardian

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Theresa May’s £30,000 salary cap on migrants is to be scrapped to meet demand for skilled workers into Britain after Brexit, under proposals to be published next week. From Telegraph

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The Migration Advisory Committee will produce a report, commissioned by the Home Secretary, next week on what level of migration would suit the British economy best. From iNews

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Boris Johnson has said the UK has “crossed the Brexit finish line” after Parliament passed legislation implementing the withdrawal deal. The EU Bill, which paves the way for the country to leave the bloc on 31 January, is now awaiting royal assent. From BBC